300 reasons I would vote for used gym socks if it would keep John McCain out of office

October 18, 2008

Reason #108

Indulge me in worshipping the cuteness of my niece.

Seriously though…  If her insane adorability isn’t enough to convince you to vote for Obama, think about what kind of world our kids will be living in under a McCain-Palin administration.  I want this beautiful baby to have a clean environment.  I want her to have equal pay and reproductive justice.  I don’t want her to go off to fight some stupid war that never ends.  I want her to grow up in a country where we value freedom and civil liberties.

McCain-Palin are going to take us down a very dark road if they manage to win this thing, and I don’t want to have to explain to my kids that I let it happen.

June 5, 2008

Reason #59

Would you look at that?

June 4, 2008

Reason #57

Filed under: Civil Rights,Reproductive Justice,Women's Rights — 300reasons @ 4:09 am

A former obstetrician and gynecologist remembers what his job was like before Roe vs. Wade:

The familiar symbol of illegal abortion is the infamous “coat hanger” — which may be the symbol, but is in no way a myth. In my years in New York, several women arrived with a hanger still in place. Whoever put it in — perhaps the patient herself — found it trapped in the cervix and could not remove it.

We did not have ultrasound, CT scans or any of the now accepted radiology techniques. The woman was placed under anesthesia, and as we removed the metal piece we held our breath, because we could not tell whether the hanger had gone through the uterus into the abdominal cavity. Fortunately, in the cases I saw, it had not.

However, not simply coat hangers were used.

Almost any implement you can imagine had been and was used to start an abortion — darning needles, crochet hooks, cut-glass salt shakers, soda bottles, sometimes intact, sometimes with the top broken off.

Another method that I did not encounter, but heard about from colleagues in other hospitals, was a soap solution forced through the cervical canal with a syringe. This could cause almost immediate death if a bubble in the solution entered a blood vessel and was transported to the heart.

The worst case I saw, and one I hope no one else will ever have to face, was that of a nurse who was admitted with what looked like a partly delivered umbilical cord. Yet as soon as we examined her, we realized that what we thought was the cord was in fact part of her intestine, which had been hooked and torn by whatever implement had been used in the abortion. It took six hours of surgery to remove the infected uterus and ovaries and repair the part of the bowel that was still functional.

John McCain has promised to choose Supreme Court judges who will overturn Roe vs. Wade, and, if elected, he would probably get the chance to tip the balance of the Supreme Court.

The choice couldn’t be clearer.

May 14, 2008

Reason #37

I missed this in the rush of finals, and I think it’s important enough to backtrack.

On April 23rd, McCain skipped the vote on the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which would ensure that people like Lily Ledbetter, who experience pay discrimination but are not able to file a charge within 180 days (Ledbetter could not do so because she didn’t find out about the pay discrimination until she had been working with Goodyear for 20 years) would still have legal recourse. McCain’s rationale? Women need more “education and training.”

Education and training would not have helped Lily Ledbetter, who was doing exactly the same job as her male counterparts, and who won awards for her job performance. She was payed less only because she was a woman.

In part because of McCain’s opposition, the Fair Pay Act did not move forward.

To give an idea of the real-world impact this will have, here’s Lily Ledbetter’s story:

Expect more conservative Supreme Court justices like the ones who ruled against Ledbetter (and more opposition to fair pay) if McCain gets into the White House.

May 7, 2008

Reason #26

I don’t think this is much of a surprise, but McCain has pledged that, if elected, he will appoint conservative judges.

From the Washington Post:

Highlighting an issue he plans to use aggressively in the general election campaign, Sen. John McCain on Tuesday decried “the common and systematic abuse of our federal courts by the people we entrust with judicial power” and pledged to nominate judges similar to the ones President Bush has placed on the bench.

The thing about our political system is that it’s really the judicial branch that has the most power, and the most longstanding power (remember Bush v. Gore?). When people with one political agenda dominate the judicial branch, it affects pretty much everything. In the chilling words of Grampy McSame himself, “Elections have consequences. One of the consequences is the president of the United States gets to name his or her nominees to the bench.”

April 15, 2008

Reason #23

Unsuprisingly, it looks like McCain’s votes against a Martin Luther King holiday were part of a larger pattern:

In 1990, McCain was one of the deciding votes in helping then-President George H.W. Bush sustain a veto against the relatively benign Civil Rights Act of 1990.

In doing so, the senator found himself at odds with majorities in both chambers of Congress, most senior African Americans within the Bush administration, and the Republican-led U.S. Civil Rights Commission. He also helped Bush became the first president ever to successfully veto a civil rights measure — Andrew Johnson in 1866 and Ronald Reagan in 1988 both had vetoes overridden.

In the end, the override lost by one vote. McCain still defends his decision today. Looks like all that “growth” McCain has been doing since his MLK vote hasn’t had much impact on his ideas about whether women and people of color should have an equal shot at employment.

April 10, 2008

Reason #20

From The Huffington Post:

A close look at John McCain’s Senate voting record on judicial confirmations makes it painfully clear that progressives need to ignore the rantings of the Ann Coulter crowd and believe John McCain when he says he will listen to Sam Brownback and appoint judges like Samuel Alito and Antonin Scalia. On judges, McCain’s no moderate: if given the chance, he will appoint justices that move an already conservative Supreme Court sharply to the right.

Indeed, one looks in vain for a judge who is too ideologically conservative for McCain: he voted to confirm Robert Bork, Clarence Thomas and, unless I’ve missed something, every other Republican judicial nominee voted on in his 22 years in the Senate.

Even more tellingly, as part of his negotiation in 2005 of what has been dubbed the “Gang of 14 Deal” (more on this later), McCain pushed, hard, for the confirmation of both William Pryor and Janice Rogers Brown, the two hardest-edged conservatives appointed to the federal bench by President George W. Bush.

For background, there are nine people on the Supreme Court.  Currently, five of them support Roe vs. Wade, while four do not.  In all likelihood, the next President will get to appoint at least one Supreme Court Justice.

Oh, and the Supreme Court doesn’t just make decisions about abortion. They do everything from choosing a President (wasn’t 2000 fun?) to making decisions about global warming and disability rights. You name an issue you care about—the Supreme Court has an impact on it. Any time there’s a 5-4 decision that narrowly averts disaster of one kind or another, we should think about what a complete and utter mess we would have on our hands if McCain were President.

Just sayin’.

 

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