300 reasons I would vote for used gym socks if it would keep John McCain out of office

June 11, 2008

Reason #70

Filed under: Veterans,War and Peace — 300reasons @ 2:38 pm

According to Grampy, bringing the troops home from Iraq is “not too important.”

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June 9, 2008

Reason #64

Filed under: War and Peace — 300reasons @ 12:59 am

June 5, 2008

Reason #59

Would you look at that?

June 3, 2008

Reason #55

Filed under: War and Peace — 300reasons @ 4:55 am

May 28, 2008

Reason #51

Filed under: Asshole,Disability Rights,Veterans,War and Peace — 300reasons @ 3:13 pm

After voting for the War in Iraq, McCain didn’t bother to show up to vote on the new GI Bill, which would provide veterans with increased college benefits. Such benefits would offer an incredibly important means of readjustment to civilian life for vets, who often come home with PTSD, physical disabilities, and other issues that put them at greater risk of ending up in poverty and homelessness. Only three senators missed the vote: Kennedy (a little busy with his brain tumor), Coburn (at a family funeral), and McCain.

Where was McCain? Raising money in California, including events organized by the owner of the San Diego Chargers. Here’s what Jon Soltz, an Iraq War Veteran and the Chairman of VoteVets.org has to say about that:

“We’re certainly pleased that the GI Bill has passed and now will likely go to the President, but disappointed that Senator McCain put his own coffers ahead of this crucial debate, and chose not to vote. Senator McCain knows how tough things are for those fighting in Iraq, and when they get home. All of us would love to spend time getting money and talking football. But, sometimes there are more important things to do in life. This is one of those times when Senator McCain could have showed some leadership by canceling his events and heading back to DC for this debate.”

Word.

Reason #50

Filed under: War and Peace — 300reasons @ 12:39 am

Of all people, John McCain should have understood what he was voting for when he voted for war.

Watch Iraq War veteran Jon Michael Turner describe what John McCain helped happen here:

H/T Huffington Post.

May 19, 2008

Reason #41

I am actually beginning to find it impossible to tell what John McCain really believes about any issue. Off the top of my head, I can think of instances where he’s flip-flopped on abortion, immigration, gay rights, campaign finance reform, the environment, and the war in Iraq. This man stands for nothing. I don’t know why he wants to be in charge of the country so badly—he doesn’t seem to have any agenda of his own.

Here he is, doing it again:

May 7, 2008

Reason #26

I don’t think this is much of a surprise, but McCain has pledged that, if elected, he will appoint conservative judges.

From the Washington Post:

Highlighting an issue he plans to use aggressively in the general election campaign, Sen. John McCain on Tuesday decried “the common and systematic abuse of our federal courts by the people we entrust with judicial power” and pledged to nominate judges similar to the ones President Bush has placed on the bench.

The thing about our political system is that it’s really the judicial branch that has the most power, and the most longstanding power (remember Bush v. Gore?). When people with one political agenda dominate the judicial branch, it affects pretty much everything. In the chilling words of Grampy McSame himself, “Elections have consequences. One of the consequences is the president of the United States gets to name his or her nominees to the bench.”

April 11, 2008

Reason #22

Filed under: Crazypants,LGBTQ Issues,Liar,Racist,Sellout,War and Peace — 300reasons @ 4:41 am

Straight talk my butt.

April 10, 2008

Reason #20

From The Huffington Post:

A close look at John McCain’s Senate voting record on judicial confirmations makes it painfully clear that progressives need to ignore the rantings of the Ann Coulter crowd and believe John McCain when he says he will listen to Sam Brownback and appoint judges like Samuel Alito and Antonin Scalia. On judges, McCain’s no moderate: if given the chance, he will appoint justices that move an already conservative Supreme Court sharply to the right.

Indeed, one looks in vain for a judge who is too ideologically conservative for McCain: he voted to confirm Robert Bork, Clarence Thomas and, unless I’ve missed something, every other Republican judicial nominee voted on in his 22 years in the Senate.

Even more tellingly, as part of his negotiation in 2005 of what has been dubbed the “Gang of 14 Deal” (more on this later), McCain pushed, hard, for the confirmation of both William Pryor and Janice Rogers Brown, the two hardest-edged conservatives appointed to the federal bench by President George W. Bush.

For background, there are nine people on the Supreme Court.  Currently, five of them support Roe vs. Wade, while four do not.  In all likelihood, the next President will get to appoint at least one Supreme Court Justice.

Oh, and the Supreme Court doesn’t just make decisions about abortion. They do everything from choosing a President (wasn’t 2000 fun?) to making decisions about global warming and disability rights. You name an issue you care about—the Supreme Court has an impact on it. Any time there’s a 5-4 decision that narrowly averts disaster of one kind or another, we should think about what a complete and utter mess we would have on our hands if McCain were President.

Just sayin’.

 

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